Namibia-Botswana Tour 2017

It has been a while since I could place an adventure photo. Some photos to enjoy.

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Thanks to Travellers!!

Thanks to Travellers!!

We wish all travellers who has travelled with Afrikaya in 2016, who made it possible for us and we hope a lot of dreams has come true for you!!

May you be blessed for 2017 and safe, may we find peace and happiness around the world and unite as a people’s nation.

Let your journey begin!!!

Afrikaya Tours Tribute

Afrikaya Leisure Travel wish to thank Afrikaya Tours (Margreet van Belle). Through all the years (10), travelling with their tourists through Africa.

This is one of the projects Afrikaya Tours is working on!

To all the people and businesses, who contributed to this school, please tell us your story and state your name or Business!

Also visit: Afrikaya Tours on Facebook.

 

 

National Parks vs Private Game Reserves

 

A self-drive in the Kruger National Park or a safari in a private game reserve? A question asked by tourists and locals alike, time and time again. Surely the animals are the same? One could even argue that between the Kruger and a private game reserve such as the Sabi Sand or Timbavati one could see exactly the same elephant, since the animals have the luxury of roaming freely between the reserves. But that’s rubbish. And here’s why… Botswana has no fences.

My first ever sighting of a hyena was on a main road in the Kruger National Park – it was a hyena pup. What a sight! But instead of being able to follow the hyena through the bush in a 4×4, we were jostling for a vantage point with a bunch of other tourists. In a closed VW Golf. Heads and cameras were outstretched in an ungainly attempt to get a half-decent photo. After half an hour we reached the front of the queue and our reward was a 30 second view of the adorable pup before being hooted at – yes…hooted! Time to move on in search of our next impala.

A real safari is about the overall experience. Tales over pre-dinner drinks from courageous rangers and the sudden use of the flash light during dinner to see the hippo in front of the deck all create the memories that urge us to return at the first opportunity. It’s about submerging yourself in an African fantasy while at the same time seeing real nature in all its spectacular (and at times brutal) glory. It’s about stepping up onto a safari vehicle in search of the Big 5. It’s about the thrill of marauding through the bush after a pack of wild dogs in hot pursuit of an impala.

Why is the game viewing better in a Private Game Reserve?
It’s private! No cars of other tourists in a dazzling array of blinding colours.

Safari vehicles can go off road. In a national park you will be limited to animals visible from the main roads.

The best and most knowledgeable rangers in the business work at the private game reserves.

Rangers are not restricted to national park hours, which means that they can go on night drives. It also means that you can stay as long as you want on a sighting!

Elevated, open-top safari vehicles give you the best view possible so you can get the perfect photo.

Rangers can lead walking safaris so that you can get that perfect photo right up the rhino’s nostril!

You might often hear about about ‘traversing rights’ in reference to your safari experience. So what are traversing rights? Traversing rights allow neighbouring lodges to drive on each others’ land which means more space for you to explore and find animals. The larger the traversing area the better! More land = more biodiversity. Limpopo, Mpumulanga and in KwaZulu-Natal.

Memory lane!!!

For the past few years we have travelled through Southern Africa.

As a tourist guide and tour operator in Southern Africa I’m proud to show some of our photos.

Enjoy and hope to see you on our next tour with:

Afrikaya Tours and Afrikaya Leisure Travel!!!!!

From Margreet van Belle and Wynand Meyer.

We wish to thank you all for making this tours all possible!!!

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IMG_7012 IMG_7055 IMG_7081 Wynand playing soccer Makgadigadi pans Fish catcher 2255 IMG_5050 IMG_5065 IMG_5071 IMG_5108 IMG_5118 IMG_5133 IMG_5177 IMG_5205 IMG_5307 IMG_5317 IMG_5068 IMG_5336 IMG_5351 IMG_5372 IMG_5445 IMG_4417 IMG_4437 IMG_4453 IMG_4465 IMG_4486 IMG_4521 IMG_4540 IMG_4579 IMG_4598 IMG_4603 IMG_4744 IMG_4747 IMG_4796 IMG_4906 IMG_4926 IMG_4947 IMG_4988 IMG_4999 IMG_5021 IMG_5476 IMG_5532 IMG_5536 IMG_5441 IMG_5487 IMG_5627 IMG_5630 IMG_5661 IMG_5689 IMG_5731 IMG_5739 IMG_5749 IMG_5516 IMG_5581 IMG_5778 IMG_5846 IMG_0065 IMG_0070 IMG_6006 IMG_6106 IMG_6107 IMG_6166 IMG_6279 IMG_6318 IMG_6350 IMG_6367 IMG_6362 IMG_6472 IMG_6473 IMG_6641 IMG_6650 IMG_6698 IMG_6711 IMG_6718 IMG_6820 IMG_6836 IMG_6863 IMG_6925 IMG_0129 IMG_6961 IMG_6968 IMG_7033 IMG_7055 IMG_0371 IMG_0049

Etosha National Park

Etsosha

Etosha National Park is a national park in northwestern Namibia. The park was proclaimed a game reserve on March 22, 1907 in Ordinance 88 by the Governor of German South West Africa, Dr. Friedrich von Lindequist. It was designated as Wildschutzgebiet Nr. 2 which means Game Reserve Number 2, in numerical order after West Caprivi (Game Reserve No. 1) and preceding Namib Game Reserve (No. 3). In 1958, Game Reserve No. 2 became Etosha Game Park and was elevated to status of National Park in 1967 by an act of parliament of the Republic of South Africa which administered South-West Africa during that time.

Etosha National Park spans an area of 22,270 square kilometres (8,600 sq mi) and gets its name from the large Etosha pan which is almost entirely within the park. The Etosha pan (4,760 square kilometres (1,840 sq mi)) covers 23% of the area of the total area of the Etosha National Park.[2] The park is home to hundreds of species of mammals, birds and reptiles, including several threatened and endangered species such as the black rhinoceros.

The park is located in the Kunene region and shares boundaries with the regions of Oshana, Oshikoto and Otjozondjupa.

Kalahari Desert

As we are frequently visiting these areas, more about The Kalahari Desert.

kalahari desert Kalahari_Desert_and_Kalahari_Basin_map.svg Kalahari

 

The Kalahari Desert (in Afrikaans Kalahari-woestyn) is a large semi-arid sandy savannah in southern Africa extending 900,000 square kilometres (350,000 sq mi), covering much of Botswana and parts of Namibia and South Africa. A semi-desert, with huge tracts of excellent grazing after good rains, the Kalahari supports more animals and plants than a true desert, such as the Namib Desert to the west. There are small amounts of rainfall and the summer temperature is very high. The driest areas usually receive 110–200 millimetres (4.3–7.9 in) of rain per year, and the wettest just a little over 500 millimetres (20 in). The surrounding Kalahari Basin covers over 2,500,000 square kilometres (970,000 sq mi) extending farther into Botswana, Namibia and South Africa, and encroaching into parts ofAngola, Zambia and Zimbabwe. The Kalahari is home to many migratory birds and animals. Previously havens for wild animals from elephants to giraffes, and for predators such as lions and cheetahs, the riverbeds are now mostly grazing spots, though leopards and cheetahs can still be found. The area is now heavily grazed and cattle fences restrict the movement of wildlife. Among deserts of the southern hemisphere, the Kalahari most closely resembles some Australian deserts in its latitude and its mode of formation.